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Mark Coffey - President

mscoffey@gmail.com

Elaine Tenenbaum - Executive Director

etenenbaum@tifound.org

History 
Temple Israel Foundation Funds
What Our Legacy Members Say
Temple Israel Cemeteries

History

The Temple Israel Foundation was founded in 1969 by several congregants who saw the need to provide for, and augment, religious life at Temple Israel. They realized the need to support customs and services, not only integral to the life of Temple Israel at that time, but also the need to support them in perpetuity. With this in mind, several congregants endowed funds to support such perpetual activities as the religious school, the general education fund, cemetery memorial fund, and the general fund. Named funds were endowed with at least $25,000.

Over the years many changes have taken place. For example, in 1997 the Temple Israel Foundation became an entity legally separate from Temple Israel. Although, the mission of the Foundation remains to provide financial support to Temple activities, its assets are now separate from the general assets of the Temple. Another significant change is that named funds no longer have to be endowed with at least $25,000, as long as they are for unrestricted use.

The number of named funds now number in the 40s, representing over $3,100,000 in assets. You can see a list of the named funds below, or in the front lobby where a plaque honors those congregants who have endowed named funds.

For further information on contributing to the Temple Israel Foundation please call Elaine Tenenbaum at (614) 866-0010 ext. 109.


Temple Israel Foundation Funds

The Temple Israel Foundation consists of endowed funds. Endowments are perpetual funds in which the gift remains invested permanently through the Foundation and generates annual interest. Endowments provide growth and stability in perpetuity for Temple Israel. Annually the Temple receives notice of the availability of funds for expenditure (currently capped at 4.5% of the total market value of the endowment).

Foundation contributors may designate their gift as “unrestricted” (in which case the gift is placed in the Foundation’s general endowment and supports general needs of the Temple); or it may be designated "restricted" (that is for a specific purpose). If one makes a major gift ($25,000 and above), one has the option of creating a named restricted or unrestricted fund. If making a restricted gift, the Foundation will document the purpose of the gift in writing so there is a permanent record of the donor’s desires.

A compelling reason to establish or contribute to such a fund is to honor the legacy of the person for whom the endowment is named. Their legacy will live in perpetuity at Temple Israel.

Current Funds of the Temple Israel Foundation

Cantorial/Music Fund
- The Paula & Stuart Levine Chair of Cantorial Music Fund

Cemetery Funds
- The Cemetery Fund
- The David Aron Weinberg Memorial Fund

Cultural Activities Fund
- The Reva & Sol Shaman Cultural Fund
- The Raymond & Pauline Kahn Art & Archives Fund
- The Jane F. Goodman Art & Education Endowment Fund

Discretionary Fund
- The Herbert & Betty Schiff Fund

Education Funds 
- The Sally & Sidney Blatt Fund
- The Laura Browar Fund
- The Rabbi Jerome & Bessie Folkman Institute for Jewish Studies Fund
- The Elizabeth & Myer Hausman Fund
- The Joseph Jacobs Fund
- The Adam Stuart Linhart Confirmation Fund
- The Loeb Family Jewish Camp Scholarship Fund
- The George & Trudy Nacht Education Fund
- The Milly & George Rosenberger Fund
- The Henry & Joseph Saeman Youth Scholarship Fund
- The Herbert & Betty Schiff Family Education Fund
- The Edward Shnider Confirmation Class Trip Fund
- The Leo Yassenoff Religious School Fund

Leadership Funds
- The Beatrice & Louis Krakoff Leadership Development Fund
- The Ernest & Aurelia Stern Leadership Development Fund

Library
- The Albert & Viola Luchs Library Fund

Music
- Gundersheimer Music Fund
- The Alexander & Ann Pollack Music Fund

Outreach/Interfaith Funds
- The Sheila D. Erdos Social Action Fund
- The Frank & Julia Glick Fund for Outreach/Interfaith
- The Nacht Family Trust for Outreach/Interfaith

Sisterhood
- The Herbert & Dorothy Fenburr Fund

Temple Israel Special Purpose Funds
- The Nancy & Louis Roseberry Goorey Annual Gift Endowment Fund
- The Vince Solomon Family Fund
- The Temple Israel Rainy Day Fund
- The Temple Israel Endowment Fund for Building Preservation
- The Abraham B. & Ruth I. Weinfeld Fund

Torah and Prayer Books 
- The Miriam R. Cohen Fund

Unrestricted Funds
- The Garel & Roth Families Fund
- The General Fund
- The Pat & Elliott Grayson Fund
- The Mattlin Family Fund
- The Stephen & Lynda Nacht Fund Part B
- The David & Beatrice Roth Fund
- The Albert Schatenstein & Rose Schatenstein Fund
- The Jody, Jeffrey, Jordan & Jamie Scheiman Fund
- The Robert N. Shamansky Memorial Fund
- The Martha & Milton Staub Memorial Fund

Youth Funds
- The Hamel & Jeannette Gurwin Children's Fund
- The Theodore & Bevlyn Simson Youth Activities Fund
- The Nacht Rainy Day Fund
- The Simson Paintings Fund
- The Youth Fund, Established by Temple Israel Foundation

Other Funds
- Building Preservation Fund, Established by Temple Israel Foundation
- The Katherine L. Friedman Religious School Fund
- The Levitin Fund


How  to Donate

Foundation Legacy Members - What They Say

Debbie Belinky

     “Temple Israel has meant so much to our family. David, z”l, and I want to make sure it’s there for others in the future. We have a special love for Temple – and I don’t mean its location. It’s deeper than that.”

Laura & Paul Greenland

    “We wanted to do something to make an impact on Temple’s future, but we were not in a financial position to ‘plunk down’ a large sum of money to create a special fund. So we purchased a life insurance policy naming Temple Israel Foundation as the insured. Financially it’s in our comfort zone to write that premium check and it feels so good to do so. This will benefit the Temple in the future as a ‘windfall’ to create a fund that will insure that more than double the current number of kids can eventually afford to attend Jewish summer camps.”


Robert (Bob) J. Kaynes

    “I support Temple because it’s important for Temple Israel and Judaism to stay alive. Educating children, life cycle events, conducting services, supporting Israel – all that is Raising Jews. And that is very important to me.  That’s why I am leaving a bequest in my will.”


Norma & Murray Katcher

    “We believe in ‘paying it forward’ – building on what previous generations have done out of love and dedication – wanting to perpetuate Judaism and watching it grow. We’re proud to have created a (paid-up) life insurance policy to which we continue to pay into, adding to the cash value of the policy for Temple’s benefit. As our parents did, so we want our children to see what we do – ‘as the tree is bent, so the limb’s inclined.’”


Clemy & Robert (Bob) Keidan

    “Temple is part of our being – that’s why we wanted to find a way to give back. For years, we volunteered in many different capacities, but now we were looking for a way to ‘pay it forward.’ We wanted to make a meaningful financial contribution to Temple Israel in a cost efficient and tax efficient way. So we made a Legacy (or deferred) gift to the Temple Israel Foundation by naming the Foundation a partial beneficiary of my (Bob’s) retirement plan, thus eventually establishing a named fund to support any area of interest.”

Susan Schubert & Mike Kravitz

    “We decided to purchase a Charitable Gift Annuity, both as a donation to the Temple and as a retirement strategy that provides for us now and for the synagogue in the future.”


Lynda & Stephen (Steve) Nacht

“Establishing a fund is a vote of confidence in the mission of the Congregation and is a way to assure that the Temple continues to grow and prosper. Finding something that ‘speaks to you’ is made more special by your contribution to it.”


Wendy & David Stone

    “We want to encourage people to be part of a community where they can build and sustain their Jewish foundation. We hope others can get out of Temple as much as we have. Temple has been the center of our Jewish life and has given us so many gifts. It’s now time to ‘pay forward.’ We’re doing it through a bequest in our wills through the Temple Israel Foundation. It’s so easy and very meaningful to us.”


Sandy & Fred Summer

    “We were young, and life insurance was something that a young person could afford, which could provide something of value to Temple in the future. So much of our lives have focused around Temple, and we realize that the support the Temple needs to thrive is planning for the future through gifts that perpetuate the best of the past and present for the sake of the future. That’s what life insurance does, and we couldn’t be more proud to be part of Temple’s legacy.”

Temple Israel Cemeteries

“To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heavens….”  ~Ecclesiastes 3:1

At a time of loss and vulnerability or when pre-planning a funeral, our members have choices for themselves and their loved ones. Temple Israel offers two setting for ground burial: traditional and garden. In both settings, Temple Israel Cemeteries provide professional, perpetual care for all grounds and facilities.

Temple Israel Cemeteries are owned and managed by the Temple Israel Foundation of Columbus, Ohio. Created in 1969 as a separate legal entity from the synagogue, the Foundation helps Temple Israel offer extraordinary programming for its members.

Temple Israel Cemetery at Alum Creek & Performance Parkway

In 2000, the Temple Israel Foundation secured new space for Temple Israel members on the grounds adjacent to four other cemeteries that comprise the Columbus Jewish Cemetery Association. This location offers a familiar design with traditional gravestones and markers for individual plots.

Some families prefer to reserve “family plots,” which will accommodate burial of up to eight family members. Each family plot can be set apart from other plots with landscaping and a larger memorial stone featuring the family name, creating a distinctive setting for future generations. To encourage families to reserve space together, the Foundation offers more flexible payment terms for the purchase of family plots.

Trees to honor or memorialize loved ones are available for purchase on the cemetery grounds.

Temple Israel Section at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens

For decades, the Temple Israel Foundation has provided space for Temple Israel members in a special section at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens.

With a contemporary feel, this setting resembles a peaceful park-like garden. The view is naturally scenic, without interruption by markers and gravestones.

It is located at Taylor Station Road and East Broad Street, just east of I-270.

Other Historic Cemeteries

Generations of Temple Israel families are buried in Sections 44 and 91 of Greenlawn Cemetery. While active burials still occur in Section 91, there are no longer plots available for sale in either of these sections.

The Jews who settled Columbus were the forefathers and foremothers of Temple Israel. One of the first efforts of the Jewish community in 1846 was to seek out burial ground. By 1850, an acre of burial ground had been secured on the grounds of what-is-now Children’s Hospital. As the city zoning laws forced the moving of the cemetery outside city boundaries, the cemetery was re-located to an acre adjoining Mt. Calvary, a Catholic cemetery. We call this the Temple Israel Cemetery at Mt. Calvary. A Civil War soldier is buried on these premises. This cemetery has not seen active burials since the 1920s.

How to Purchase

Temple Israel is here to serve you at such time as you wish to seek guidance regarding purchase of burial plots. For information about Temple Israel cemeteries, please contact Temple Israel Foundation Executive Director, Elaine Tenenbaum, (614) 866-0010 x 109.

Wed, September 20 2017 29 Elul 5777